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Yearly Feline Checkup and Protocols


Yearly Feline Vaccination Protocols

Your pet should be examined on a yearly basis to ensure that he/she is in optimal health. Checkups once a year for a dog or cat is like a human visiting the doctor every 7-8 years. As you know, pets do not live as long as we do and they cannot tell us if something is wrong; therefore, changes that occur with aging and systemic illness can overwhelm a pet before we are able to recognize that there is a problem. Regular checkups help determine if these changes may be occurring in your pet. Preventing or detecting an illness early prevents unnecessary pain, slows or reverses the progression of a disease, usually costs the owner less money over time, and extends the life of the pet in most cases. During the examination, the doctor will assess many different body systems checking the following: heart rate, respiratory rate, capillary refill (perfusion test), hydration status, auscultate the heart for arrhythmias and murmurs, check the pulse, pulse quality, and auscultate the lungs for any respiratory problems. He will also check the eyes, ears, skin, coat, joints, mouth (teeth, tongue, oral cavity), reproductive and urinary tract, anal glands, palpation of the internal organs, and screen for any illnesses that may not be apparent from a physical exam.

Cats who are at risk and not vaccinated for Leukemia or FIV (feline AIDS) should have a Leukemia and FIV blood screen performed. Those cats who are at risk then (if testing negative) can be vaccinated against these deadly diseases. If you are unfamiliar with these diseases, please ask a staff member or Dr.Guidry if your cat is at risk and needs to be tested and/or vaccinated. Not all cats should be vaccinated for these diseases!

New research has shown that as much as 15% of the cat population in South Louisiana is infected with heartworms. Even cats that spend their entire lives indoors are being affected since the disease is spread by mosquitoes that fly into our homes. The problem with cats is that there is not a reliable test and no current mediations to kill heartworms in cats. Cats with heartworms exhibit asthma-like symptoms. The disease can be easily prevented by using monthly preventatives. Please ask one of our knowledgeable staff to assist you in determining a product that is appropriate for your cat.

The following are vaccines that cats receive on a yearly basis:

  • Feline Rhinotracheitis-Calici-Panleukopenia-Chlamydia (FVRCP-C) vaccine
  • +/- Leukemia vaccine (outdoor cats and kittens, or cats otherwise at risk)
  • Rabies vaccine

We currently do not screen cats for intestinal parasites. Cats find the procedure very rude and invasive. We also feel that we usually do not obtain an adequate sample of feces to make a correct assessment of parasite presence.

Dr.Guidry does not believe in over-vaccinating pets. He continuously monitors current immunology protocols for any updates recommended by AAHA (national veterinary organization for hospital regulations and protocols). You, Dr.Guidry, and any health risk will determine which vaccines are appropriate for your pet’s health. Dr.Guidry will also be glad to discuss vaccination protocols prior to vaccinating your pet(s).

  • All visits will have an Office Visit charge
  • Microchipping is a great idea to prevent theft or loss, and to use as a permanent form of I.D. for any pet. It is inserted under the skin with a needle just like a vaccine. It can be performed during any routine visit and requires no sedation (it lasts for the life of the pet).
  • +/- indicates that your cat may or may not need this service
  • This is to serve as a guideline to services that your pet may need. This is not to be considered an estimate of services and issued for the purpose of a sample of the services we offer our patients. The doctor invests time studying these protocols and will determine any health risk on an individual basis and change a protocol to best fit the patient. Price are dictated by the cost of supplies and medication. Therefore, prices may change without notice.
  • Please call our office at (337) 981-0909 so we may reserve an appointment for you and your pet.


Welcome to Animal Care Hospital Lafayette

Office Hours

Monday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Tuesday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Wednesday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Thursday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Friday:

7:30 am-6:00 pm

Saturday:

8:00 am to 12:00 pm (OPEN THE 2nd & 4th SATURDAY OF THE MONTH)

Sunday:

Closed

Location

Testimonials

  • "Dr. Anderson has always gone above and beyond for the care of our family's pets for several years."
    John Doe / San Diego, CA

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